An analysis of a secondary level intervention for high school students at risk of school failure: The High School Behavior Education Program

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Title: An analysis of a secondary level intervention for high school students at risk of school failure: The High School Behavior Education Program
Author: Swain-Bradway, Jessica L., 1976-
Abstract: The High School Behavior Education Program (HS-BEP) is a secondary level intervention for high school "at risk" students that provides both academic and social supports. Students participating in the HS-BEP attend a 45-minute study-skills course two to three days a week that focuses on organizational and self-management skills. As part of the study-skills class, students also participate in a modified behavior education program (BEP) designed to establish access to adult support. Six high school students identified by their teachers as "at risk" socially, and/or academically participated in the study. The students were enrolled in a Pacific Northwest high school implementing school-wide positive behavior support. Direct observation and permanent product data were collected on (a) the fidelity with which the HS-BEP was implemented, (b) academic engagement during general content classes (English, math, history, etc.), (c) problem behavior during classes, (d) percentages of course assignment completion, (e) class attendance, and (f) number of office discipline referrals. A single-case multiple baseline experimental design across students was used to assess the primary research question: is there a functional relation between the implementation of the HS-BEP and an increase in academic engagement. Secondary analyses examined the impact of the HS-BEP on (a) decreases in problem behaviors, (b) increases in assignment completion, (c) increases in class attendance, and (d) decreases in office discipline referrals for "at risk" high school students engaging in escape maintained behaviors. Results demonstrated a functional relation between implementation of the HS-BEP and improved academic engagement. Levels of problem behavior were too low to assess impact, and small to moderate improvements in assignment completion were observed. Implications are provided for the design of secondary-level supports in high schools. References
Description: xv, 253 p. : ill. A print copy of this thesis is available through the UO Libraries. Search the library catalog for the location and call number.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/10262
Date: 2009-06


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