A Study of Bicycle Commuting in Minneapolis: How Much do Bicycle-Oriented Paths Increase Ridership and What Can be Done to Further Use?

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Title: A Study of Bicycle Commuting in Minneapolis: How Much do Bicycle-Oriented Paths Increase Ridership and What Can be Done to Further Use?
Author: Pachuta, Emma, 1984-
Abstract: Car use has become the dominant form of transportation, contributing to the health, environmental, and sprawl issues our nation is facing. Alternative modes of transport within urban environments are viable options in alleviating many of these problems. This thesis looks the habits and trends of bicyclists along the Midtown Greenway, a bicycle/pedestrian pathway that runs through Minneapolis, Minnesota and questions whether implementing non-auto throughways has encouraged bicyclists to bike further and to more destinations since its completion in 2006. The methods used to gather data were in-person five-minute surveys given to bicyclists, and analysis of existing data provided by non-profit organizations. Results included mapping each surveyed trip to see taken routes as well as qualitative and quantitative answers. Answers varied, but overall, it seemed that both commuting and leisure riders have increased their trips and distance within Minneapolis since completion of the path, advocating for off-street routes within the city.
Description: xi, 43 p. : ill. (some col.) A print copy of this thesis is available through the UO Libraries. Search the library catalog for the location and call number.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/10716
Date: 2010-06


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