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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Emily Jane
dc.contributor.authorMoseley, Cassandra
dc.contributor.authorNielsen-Pincus, Max
dc.contributor.authorAbrams, Jesse
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Cullen
dc.contributor.authorChristoffersen, Nils
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Chad
dc.contributor.authorEnzer, Maia J.
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Josef
dc.contributor.authorGoulette, Nick
dc.contributor.authorJungwirth, Lynn
dc.contributor.authorJungwirth, Jim
dc.contributor.authorKauffman, Marcus
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Tyler
dc.contributor.authorShannon, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorSundstrom, Shiloh
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-13T22:32:29Z
dc.date.available2010-10-13T22:32:29Z
dc.date.issued2010-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/10802
dc.description94 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Dry Forest Zone is a region of eastern Oregon and northern California with challenging market conditions and high levels of poverty and unemployment. However, local entrepreneurship, collaboration, and commitment to integrated economic development and natural resource management in the zone are strong. In the past decade, the scope of community-based nonprofits, integrated biomass utilization businesses, and new networks has increased, fostering sustainable forest stewardship at an increasingly regional scale. The geography and climate of the zone support dry forests of pine and mixed conifer with fire regimes that are departed from their historical range of variability. These forests are prone to wildfire hazards and in need of active management to restore more diverse and variable-aged structures. As 68 percent of the land in the zone is public, the communities of this region rely on the economic and ecological productivity of these federal forests. The number of sawmills that once provided high levels of primary processing capacity and employment has shrunk to nine mills in the zone. More forest-related employment is now forestry support work, including activities such as firefighting, pest control, and thinning. Poverty and unemployment have increased, with estimated poverty levels in 2007 of over 15 percent in ten of the fifteen counties. Through the Dry Forest Zone project, we have an opportunity to build on the local strengths of this region and overcome these ecological and socioeconomic challenges.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFinancial support was provided the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities, USDA Rural Development, and the Ford Foundation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherEcosystem Workforce Program, Institute for a Sustainable Environment, University of Oregonen_US
dc.subjectLand use -- Oregon, Eastern
dc.subjectNatural resources -- Oregon, Eastern -- Management
dc.subjectEconomic development -- Oregon, Eastern
dc.subjectOregon, Eastern
dc.titleThe State of the Dry Forest Zone and its Communitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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