Oregon Law Review : Vol. 88 No. 3, p.745-776 : No More Nisour Squares: Legal Control of Private Security Contractors in Iraq and After

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dc.contributor.author Tiefer, Charles
dc.date.accessioned 2010-10-14T22:50:33Z
dc.date.available 2010-10-14T22:50:33Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.issn 0196-2043
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1794/10805
dc.description 32 p. en_US
dc.description.abstract This Article analyzes and builds upon the somewhat successful steps taken by the Department of Defense and the Department of State in 2008–2009 to manage the problem of the Blackwater incident at Nisour Square . Analyzing those steps shows a key strand consisting of what may be called the “contract law” approach. In the much-expanded form proposed in this Article, the “contract law” approach would use government contract requirements, contracting tools and sanctions, contract-related claims, and distinctive contract-related suits to both control and remedy private security abuses and injuries. This Article continues my prior studies as a professor of government contracting law with a specific interest in the Iraq war. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Oregon Law School en_US
dc.subject Nisour Square (Baghdad, Iraq) en_US
dc.subject Blackwater Worldwide en_US
dc.subject Contract law en_US
dc.subject Iraq War, 2003-2011 en_US
dc.title Oregon Law Review : Vol. 88 No. 3, p.745-776 : No More Nisour Squares: Legal Control of Private Security Contractors in Iraq and After en_US
dc.title.alternative No More Nisour Squares: Legal Control of Private Security Contractors in Iraq and After en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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