A National Energy Policy for the United States: An Interim Report Comparing Current Legislation Before the 111th Congress and Recommendations for a National Energy Policy for the United States: An Interim Report Comparing Current Legislation Before the 111th Congress and Recommendations For a National Energy Policy for the United States

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Title: A National Energy Policy for the United States: An Interim Report Comparing Current Legislation Before the 111th Congress and Recommendations for a National Energy Policy for the United States: An Interim Report Comparing Current Legislation Before the 111th Congress and Recommendations For a National Energy Policy for the United States
Author: Dirks, Brian; McPheters, Tyler; Thompson, Paul; Veltri, Brandi; Best, Ian; Steffen, Justin; Johnsen, Anna; Kraft, Aaron; O'Connor, William; Kane, Jeff; Ross, Juliane
Abstract: This white paper is designed in the mode of classic British Parliamentary white papers. It builds upon two previous white papers completed by students at the University of Oregon School of Law which in turn were based upon three recent ground-breaking efforts of a similar nature: Center for American Progress (CAP), Capturing the Energy Opportunity, 2007 The National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP), Ending the Energy Stalemate, 2004 NCEP, Energy Policy Recommendations to the President and 110th Congress, 2007 (updates Ending the Energy Stalemate) These three papers led to an active, national dialogue on the sine qua non policies of a National Energy Policy (NEP) for the United States. They stimulated a renewed effort to further research and assess policies to be considered for inclusion. This charge was taken up by advanced graduate students at the School of Law enrolled in Law610/08 and Law610/09. After analyzing each of the white papers the students consolidated the recommendations in each of them into six over-arching policy areas.1 The six represent the sine qua non policies as seen by the CAP and NCEP authors. Having divided themselves into teams representing each of the six areas, the students proceeded to analyze the CAP and NCEP authors’ work. In doing so, the teams assessed: 1. the policy’s advantages, 2. potential problems in its implementation and administration, 3. the policy’s natural constituencies, opposition, and neutrals, 4. budgetary considerations, and 5. promotion strategy(ies), including global linkages. As a final task, each group set out recommendations for reformulations and/or additional policies designed to strengthen those analyzed. The result: a draft set of NEP policies.
Description: 68 p.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/10814
Date: 2010-04


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