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dc.contributor.authorForster, Hale
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-16T20:38:06Z
dc.date.available2011-03-16T20:38:06Z
dc.date.createdMarch 12, 2010
dc.date.issued2011-03-16T20:38:06Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/11039
dc.descriptionSubmitted to the Undergraduate Library Research Award scholarship competition: 2010-11. 35 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, I will explore whether, and how the Helsinki and the Oslo Protocols influenced emissions behavior, and whether the use of differentiated targets increased the effectiveness of the Oslo Protocol. The data I will present suggests that while the existence ofthe Oslo Protocol was probably more likely due to its use of differentiated goals, differentiated goals in general did not have an appreciable effect on emissions reductions behavior because of the way in which the goals were set, and because of other variables which had a much stronger effect on the outcome ofthe treaty. I will conclude that while the overall amount of sulfur emissions decreased during the period in which the treaties were in effect, the treaties caused a portion of these reductions in only a limited number of countries, and other, unrelated factors likely caused the bulk of emissions reductions.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregon
dc.subjectHelinski protocolen_US
dc.subjectOslo protocolen_US
dc.subjectSulfur emissionsen_US
dc.subjectGreenhouse gas mitigation
dc.titleCommon versus Differentiated Goals in the Face of Between-Country Inequities: Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Helsinki and Oslo Protocols on the Reduction of Sulfur Emissionsen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


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