An examination of the influence of primed characteristics of identity on motivation to learn conflict resolution skills

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dc.contributor.author Walters, Karrie Patrice, 1973-
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-19T23:20:08Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-19T23:20:08Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1794/11184
dc.description xiii, 105 p. A print copy of this thesis is available through the UO Libraries. Search the library catalog for the location and call number. en_US
dc.description.abstract In this study I examined whether priming salient characteristics in martial arts students' martial arts identity would influence their motivation to learn conflict resolution skills. Through a factorial, between-subjects experimental design I evaluated the effects of priming three different characteristics of a martial arts identity on 242 martial arts students, including 'peace' and 'competition' characteristics (experimental conditions) and an exercise" characteristic (control condition). I also examined whether the strength of the specific martial arts identity primed would moderate this relationship and assessed the impact of the conditions on participants' value and self-efficacy for conflict resolution skills, as these are theoretically related to motivation to learn. By using both multivariate analyses of covariance and binary logistical analysis, I assessed for outcome differences among the conditions. Results demonstrated that participants primed with the notion that `peaceful' characteristics were related to a martial arts identity were significantly more likely to want additional training in conflict resolution skills in comparison to participants primed with the notion that `competitive' characteristics were related to a martial arts identity. When experimental conditions were compared to the control condition, effects differed by sex. The peace prime significantly predicted that men would want additional training in conflict resolution skills, but not women. The competition prime significantly predicted that women would not want additional training in conflict resolution skills, but this was not true for men. Contrary to hypotheses, strength of identity was not a significant moderator of these relationships, and significant differences between experimental and control conditions were not found for the outcome measures of participant value and self-efficacy of conflict resolution skills. Ceiling effects and measurement issues may explain the lack of significant findings on a continuous measure of motivation to learn, but the dichotomous motivation to learn outcome variable was significantly influenced by the prime conditions in the hypothesized directions. Results of this study have the potential to improve the content and delivery of conflict resolution training with the purpose of improving participant participation and engagement. Study results, strengths, limitations, and implications for future research and practice are discussed. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Committee in charge: Benedict McWhirter, Chairperson, Counseling Psychology and Human Services; Ellen McWhirter, Member, Counseling Psychology and Human Services; Lauren Lindstrom, Member, Counseling Psychology and Human Services; Thomas Dishion, Outside Member, Psychology en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Oregon en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries University of Oregon theses, Dept. of Counseling Psychology and Human Services, Ph. D., 2010;
dc.subject Motivation to learn en_US
dc.subject Identity en_US
dc.subject Adult en_US
dc.subject Priming en_US
dc.subject Gender en_US
dc.subject Martial arts en_US
dc.subject Conflict resolution en_US
dc.subject Educational psychology en_US
dc.subject Counseling psychology en_US
dc.title An examination of the influence of primed characteristics of identity on motivation to learn conflict resolution skills en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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