Social Skills Triad: Promoting Social Competence in Teens with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) / High Functioning Autism (HFA)

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Title: Social Skills Triad: Promoting Social Competence in Teens with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) / High Functioning Autism (HFA)
Author: Copeland, Haidee A., 1963-
Abstract: This dissertation presents the findings of a Type 2 translational research study to develop and test the feasibility and social validity of a social skills intervention for middle/secondary students with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) / High Functioning Autism (HFA). Utilizing a technology adoption model (TAM), this dissertation project sought to develop and test the feasibility of a three-tiered social skills curriculum/training program to promote social competency in teens with AS/HFA across multiple settings: school, home, and community. The TAM was developed in 2004 by Gardner and Amoroso to provide a more rigorous methodology by which to assess the acceptance of the technology by consumers. The development of an intervention that includes parental input in a repeated measurement of social validity and efficiency over time, together with the inclusion of a unique population parameter (parental groups) within a repeated measure, reinforced the appropriateness of the decision to use a Type 2 translational research model. This study consisted of two distinct phases. Phase 1 of the development process was conducted using separate focus participant groups: Group A (students with AS/HFA), Group B (parents/caregivers of students with AS/HFA), and Group C (educators of teens with AS/HFA). Phase 2, a small pilot study utilizing the newly created curriculum, was conducted using complete triads. This triad consisted of a student with AS/HFA, the student's parent/caregiver, and an educator of said student. These groups (ultimately triads) developed and refined a school-facilitated social skills intervention that utilized the goals and objectives of the student and her/his family in conjunction with existing opportunities within the community to design, implement, track, and modify a social skills program that was functional for the unique needs of the student. Findings suggest the Social Skills Triad curriculum may be a viable alternative method for teens with AS/HFA to develop and master social skills across settings over time that are meaningful to students, their families, and the home/school communities in which they function.
Description: xiv, 115 p. : ill. (some col.)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/11528
Date: 2011-06


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