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dc.contributor.authorPica, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBeere, Don
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T21:18:44Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T21:18:44Z
dc.date.issued1995-12
dc.identifier.issn0896-2863
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/1153
dc.descriptionp. 241-246en
dc.description.abstractBreaking from the traditional mode of dissociation research, this study examines the experience of dissociation during positive situations. Thirty-three of ninety (36.7%) randomly selected undergraduate students reported positive dissociative experiences. In order of ranked frequency the experiences included sports, sexual encounters, prayer, contact with nature, anticipating good news, hearing good news, acting, hobbies, musical performances, and listening to music. Interestingly, low as well as high dissociators reported these types of experiences suggesting that one need not be highly dissociative in order to dissociate during a positive situation. A qualitative analysis of descriptions of positive dissociative experiences coincides precisely with Beere's perceptual theory of dissociation : dissociation occurs when perception narrows during an intense situation of personal significance and, thus, blocks out the background.en
dc.format.extent493177 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherRidgeview Institute and the International Society for the Study of Dissociationen
dc.titleDissociation : Vol. 8, No. 4, p. 241-246 : Dissociation during positive situationsen
dc.title.alternativeDissociation during positive situationsen
dc.typeArticleen


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