Cattle Plague in NYC: The Untold Campaign of America’s First Board of Health, 1868

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Title: Cattle Plague in NYC: The Untold Campaign of America’s First Board of Health, 1868
Author: Erlandson, Erik M.
Abstract: America’s first health board has received ample attention from scholars for its unprecedented containment of cholera in 1866, but there is more to the history of New York’s Metropolitan Board of Health (MBH) than this campaign. In 1868, the nascent health organization faced its next big challenge, which has never been covered by secondary literature. In August, infected Texas cattle arrived at New York slaughterhouses, threatening the food supply of North America’s largest city. To fight the pestilence, the MBH adopted unprecedented policies for 19th century public health institutions, which had long been inclined toward local autonomy. During the cattle plague, however, MBH officers exerted their will outside their legal jurisdiction, and cooperated with other states on public health regulation in historically uncommon ways. This thesis explores how the MBH fought the epizootic, what impact the disease had, and why historically rare activism occurred.
Description: Submitted to the Undergraduate Library Research Award scholarship competition: (2012). 68 p.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/12138
Date: 2012


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