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dc.contributor.authorVan Alst, Laura Jane
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-20T23:24:53Z
dc.date.available2012-04-20T23:24:53Z
dc.date.issued2011-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/12191
dc.descriptionix, 44 p. : ill. (some col.)en_US
dc.description.abstractThe physical weathering of rock in cryogenic regions through a process called ice segregation is important for understanding subglacial processes, landscape evolution and cold region engineering. Ice segregation was examined by freezing water-saturated cores of Eugene Formation sandstone at temperatures between -15° and -2°C. Cores between -8° and -5°C took 30-45 minutes to crack, while cores at warmer or cooler temperatures took either more than 90 minutes or did not crack at all. Numerical modeling shows that cores break under isothermal conditions. The results of this study suggest that previous models in which temperature gradients are held responsible for driving flow towards growing cracks are incomplete. I introduce a new model of ice segregation to explain how premelted liquids from smaller pores can migrate and contribute to the growth of large cracks. This dissertation includes unpublished material.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCommittee in charge: Alan Rempel, Chairperson; Joshua Roering, Member; Rebecca Dorsey, Memberen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Oregon theses, Dept. of Geological Sciences, M.S., 2011;
dc.rightsrights_reserveden_US
dc.subjectGeophysicsen_US
dc.subjectEarth sciencesen_US
dc.subjectCryogenic weatheringen_US
dc.subjectIce segregationen_US
dc.titleLaboratory Experiments in Cold Temperature Rock Deformationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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