Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorParmigiani, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorKrause, Alanen_US
dc.creatorKrause, Alanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T01:42:48Z
dc.date.available2012-10-26T01:42:48Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/12338
dc.description.abstractHow do organizations assess and explain their performance? Prior studies have attempted to demonstrate that, like individuals, organizations take credit for good performance and blame poor performance on influences in their environment. However, these studies have found only a weak relationship between performance and attribution at the level of the firm. This dissertation seeks to elucidate this relationship by conceptualizing firms as social agents and by combining aspiration and attribution theory for the first time at the level of the firm. Analysis of performance explanations by large, public manufacturing firms in 2004 and 2005 revealed that firms' performance explanations correlated with their cognitive experiences of success and failure. These findings further understanding of organizational cognition, attribution, and image management.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregonen_US
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.subjectAspirationen_US
dc.subjectAttributionen_US
dc.subjectImage managementen_US
dc.subjectMulti-level theoryen_US
dc.subjectOrganizational cognitionen_US
dc.subjectPerformance assessmenten_US
dc.titleGreat Expectations and Dodgy Explanationsen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record