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dc.contributor.authorYoung, Walter C.
dc.date.accessioned2005-09-01T22:11:42Z
dc.date.available2005-09-01T22:11:42Z
dc.date.issued1988-03
dc.identifier.issn0896-2863
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/1278
dc.descriptionp. 33-38.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper contrasts the roles of splitting and dissociation in multiple personality disorder. It is proposed that dissociation is a unique defensive process that serves to protect the patient from the overwhelming effects of severe trauma and that multiple personality disorder need not call upon splitting as its central defensive process. Fantasies of restitution may be incorporated into the dissociative defense. Psychological, physiological, and behavioral models all are of use, making it likely that ultimately dissociation will be understood along multiple Iines of study.en
dc.format.extent760932 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherRidgeview Institute and the International Society for the Study of Multiple Personality & Dissociationen
dc.titleDissociation : Vol. 1, No. 1, p. 033-038 : Psychodynamics and Dissociation : All that Switches Is Not Spliten
dc.title.alternativePsychodynamics and Dissociation : All that Switches Is Not Spliten
dc.typeArticleen


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