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dc.contributor.advisorHessler, Julieen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Romanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-03T23:35:16Z
dc.date.available2013-10-03T23:35:16Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/13299
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores how and why two capitalistic American corporations were granted access to the Soviet Union's internal market. For decades communist leadership railed against what they termed "cheap bourgeois consumption," yet in 1972 Pepsi-Cola became the first officially sanctioned American consumer product in the USSR. Eighteen years later, McDonald's would become the first American restaurant to open in the Soviet Union. Both companies became deeply involved in Cold War politics and diplomacy, with high-ranking officials from both sides taking part in the negotiations to bring these companies into the country. These two case studies shed light on a seldom-covered aspect of American-Soviet economic relations and cultural exchange.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregonen_US
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.subjectDonald Kendallen_US
dc.subjectGeorge Cohenen_US
dc.subjectMcDonald'sen_US
dc.subjectPepsiCoen_US
dc.subjectSoviet Unionen_US
dc.subjectUSSRen_US
dc.titleAmerican Fast Food as Culture and Politics: The Introduction of Pepsi and McDonald's into the USSRen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Historyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Oregonen_US


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