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dc.contributor.authorGabel, Stewart
dc.date.accessioned2005-10-07T16:20:56Z
dc.date.available2005-10-07T16:20:56Z
dc.date.issued1990-03
dc.identifier.issn0896-2863
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/1484
dc.descriptionp. 038-047en
dc.description.abstractThe linkage between dreams and various dissociative phenomena has often been noted on an intuitive or clinical basis. Dream theory during this century, however, has been associated with and helped to provide the framework for psychoanalytic theory, not dissociation theory. In recent years interest in dissociation theory and dissociative phenomena has grown. This has also been true of the interest in dreams as understood from vantage points that dispute classical psychoanalytic views on dreaming and that emphasize a role for dreaming in learning and adaptive behavior. This paper reviews some of these issues in greater detail. It emphasizes the apparent linkage between dream phenomena and particular dream theories with dissociation theory. Possible benefits to dream theory and to dissociation theory when dreams are considered within a broader framework of dissociation are discussed from several viewpoints.en
dc.format.extent500767 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherRidgeview Institute and the International Society for the Study of Multiple Personality and Dissociationen
dc.titleDissociation : Vol. 3, No. 1, p. 038-047 : Dreams and Dissociation Theory: Speculations on Beneficial Aspects of Their Linkageen
dc.title.alternativeDreams and Dissociation Theory: Speculations on Beneficial Aspects of Their Linkageen
dc.typeArticleen


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