Dissociation : Vol. 9, No. 4, p. 232-243 : Delayed memories of child abuse: part II: an overview of research findings relevant to understanding their reliability and suggestibility

Show full item record

Title: Dissociation : Vol. 9, No. 4, p. 232-243 : Delayed memories of child abuse: part II: an overview of research findings relevant to understanding their reliability and suggestibility
Author: Bowman, Elizabeth S.
Abstract: This article reviews data from four areas of memory research which are clinically relevant to understanding the reliability and suggestibility of delayed memories of abuse in dissociative disorder patients. Research supports the suggestibility of eyewitness memory for non-dramatic events, but not for personally experienced trauma. Hypnosis has been found to increase memory suggestibility and confidence in correct and incorrect memories in laboratory studies, while the accuracy of hypnotically recalled memories in psychotherapy have been highly supported by corroboration. High hypnotizability, however, appears more important than hypnosis in producing laboratory pseudomemories. Autobiographical memory research indicates that the reliability of adulthood memories prior to age three is uncertain, but some traumatic memories from age two persist. Accurate behavioral memories of trauma may persist when verbal ones are absent. Interview techniques greatly affect memory suggestibility, with free recall producing the least suggestibility. Therapists can minimize memory distortions by educating patients about memory reliability, using open-ended questions, avoiding hypnotic recall, using active memory source monitoring, and supportively exploring the reliability of emerging memories.
Description: p. 232-243
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/1768
Date: 1996-12


Files in this item

Files Size Format View
Diss_9_4_3_OCR_rev.pdf 2.906Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record