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dc.contributor.authorMorgan, J.E.
dc.date.accessioned2005-10-30T20:47:29Z
dc.date.available2005-10-30T20:47:29Z
dc.date.issued1996-06
dc.identifier.issn0896-2863
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/1794
dc.descriptionp. 089-097en
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about the day-to-day dissociative behaviors manifested by inmates of correctional institutions. This article, based on 25 months of naive, continuous participant observation, describes five types of commonly observed dissociative behaviors that suggest that severe dissociative disorders may be common in inmates, and are also found in prison employees. The data come from an urban male and female maximum security correctional facility. The article discusses the differences in dissociative phenomena between the inmate and employee groups, the important elements in their behavioral patterns, and the traumatic events likely to have contributed to the dissociative behaviors. It suggests that correctional institutions can be viewed as unrecognized mental health facilities for dissociative disorders and considers how expertise in dissociative disorders can be integrated into their management.en
dc.format.extent358885 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherRidgeview Institute and the International Society for the Study of Dissociationen
dc.titleDissociation : Vol. 9, No. 2, p. 089-097 : Types of dissociative behaviors observed in an urban jail: 25 months of participant observationen
dc.title.alternativeTypes of dissociative behaviors observed in an urban jail: 25 months of participant observationen
dc.typeArticleen


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