Dissociation : Vol. 9, No. 2, p. 134-139 : Impact of childhood abuse on adult psychopathology: a case report

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dc.contributor.author Lubin, Hadar
dc.contributor.author Johnson, David Read
dc.contributor.author Southwick, Steven M.
dc.date.accessioned 2005-10-30T21:00:38Z
dc.date.available 2005-10-30T21:00:38Z
dc.date.issued 1996-06
dc.identifier.issn 0896-2863
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1794/1808
dc.description p. 134-139 en
dc.description.abstract Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), borderline personality disorder (BPD) and multiple personality disorder (MPD), although categorized separately in DSM-III-R under anxiety disorder, personality disorder, and dissociative disorder, respectively, have each been shown to be associated with early childhood abuse. Many authors have noted the importance of determining the relative impact of childhood trauma on the etiology of psychiatric illness, both from diagnostic and treatment perspectives. In this article, we will present the case of a multiply traumatized woman who satisfies criteria for all three disorders, providing support for the hypothesis that these three diagnoses may be viewed as separate phenotypic expressions of a common origin: childhood trauma. A hierarchical model of adaptation to childhood abuse is proposed to order the clinical data. en
dc.format.extent 346154 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Ridgeview Institute and the International Society for the Study of Dissociation en
dc.title Dissociation : Vol. 9, No. 2, p. 134-139 : Impact of childhood abuse on adult psychopathology: a case report en
dc.title.alternative Impact of childhood abuse on adult psychopathology: a case report en
dc.type Article en


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