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dc.contributor.advisorAsim, Inaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFortenberry, Kyleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-29T17:53:10Z
dc.date.available2014-09-29T17:53:10Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/18427
dc.description.abstractDrawing from trends in environmental and disaster studies, this study examines the meaning of earthquakes within the official histories of China's Tang Dynasty (618-907), specifically those during the reign of Emperor Dezong (r. 785-805), as both historiographic metaphors and incidents of real natural-induced disaster. Earthquakes, like other forms of potentially harmful natural phenomena, demonstrated, the Chinese believed, Heaven's dissatisfaction with a sitting ruler. Over time, ministers and court scholars sought to draw connections between earthquakes and specific forms of behavior in attempts to perhaps prevent future incidents of seismic reproach. And though certain relationships are articulated more clearly in some parts of the histories than others, earthquakes nevertheless demonstrated an ability to engender a great sense of uncertainty and discord within historical memory. Consequently, the reading of the natural world codified in the official histories marked an attempt by the Chinese state to control human behavior for generations to come.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregonen_US
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectDezongen_US
dc.subjectEarthquakeen_US
dc.subjectTangen_US
dc.titleFinding Fault: Earthquakes During the Reign of Tang Dezong (785-805)en_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Historyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Oregonen_US


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