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dc.contributor.authorHardberger, Amy
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-03T16:54:40Z
dc.date.available2016-08-03T16:54:40Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-01
dc.identifier.citation17 Or. Rev. Int'l. L. 307 (2016)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1543-9860
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/20020
dc.description34 pagesen_US
dc.description.abstractFrom the moment States created political boundaries to define their territory, they have shared water. There are 263 transboundary lake and river basins worldwide and 300 known transboundary aquifer systems. Whenever sharing is present, the opportunity for conflict is too. Climate change and increasing population are only two factors that may lead to increasing conflict if attention is not given to these situations.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregon School of Lawen_US
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.subjectWater rightsen_US
dc.subjectTreatiesen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.titleForgetting Nature: The Importance of Including Environmental Flows in International Water Agreementsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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