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dc.contributor.authorMunoz, Antonio
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-01T23:49:42Z
dc.date.available2017-09-01T23:49:42Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/22611
dc.descriptionSingle page posteren_US
dc.description.abstractMice rely on their sense of smell for spatial navigation in their environment. Navigation with regards to smell relies on using odor concentrations to home in on an odor source of interest. Olfactory neuron populations exist that are sensitive to changes in odor concentration. However, the olfactory sensory processing that mediate this behavior in mice is not fully understood yet. The overall goal is to understand how the brain tracks changes in stimuli. We focus on how the olfactory system processes change in odor concentration. Our paradigm involves the use of trained head-fixed mice. The use of head-fixed mice allows for precise control over the odor stimuli. Our equipment allows me to present a concentration of odor directly when a mouse inhales. This allows me to manipulate the concentration of odor to which the mice will be exposed between various sniff cycles. Using a behavioral paradigm, I will test how sensitive mice are to detecting a change in odor concentration. This behavioral task will demonstrate how mice track stimulus changes over time and will lay the groundwork for determining how perception relates to neural activity.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipResearch reported in this poster was supported by Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under award number R25HD0708.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0-USen_US
dc.subjectOlfactory systemen_US
dc.subjectSensory inputen_US
dc.subjectOdor detectionen_US
dc.titleOdor Concentration Change Sensingen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


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