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dc.contributor.authorYearsley, David
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-06T23:17:27Z
dc.date.available2018-11-06T23:17:27Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationYearsley, David. "Princes of Peace and War and their Most Humble, Most Obedient Court Composer." Konturen [Online], 1.1 (2008): n. pag. Web. 6 Nov. 2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn1947-3796
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/23935
dc.description33 pagesen_US
dc.description.abstractJ. S. Bach took many of his own vocal works conceived as tributes to earthly sovereigns and transformed them into glorifications of the heavenly King. Yet in contrast to the implications of some aspects of Luther's theology, these transformations leave undisturbed an underlying commitment to temporal authority and social obedience. Indeed, many of Bach's sacred works not only rely on rhetorical and musical topics associated with court life and the culture of war, but exploit these images in order to dramatize their message more immediately in the imaginations of contemporary churchgoing listeners.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0-USen_US
dc.subjectJ. S. Bachen_US
dc.subjectSecular musicen_US
dc.subjectSacred musicen_US
dc.titlePrinces of Peace and War and their Most Humble, Most Obedient Court Composeren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5399/uo/konturen.1.1.1276


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