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dc.contributor.authorMorriss, Andrew P. 1960-
dc.date.accessioned2007-07-31T18:56:22Z
dc.date.available2007-07-31T18:56:22Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citation80 Or. L. Rev. 861 (2001)en
dc.identifier.issn0196-2043
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/4597
dc.description86 p.en
dc.description.abstractThis Article examines the development of water law in the West and suggests reliance on a common law rather than a central planning, regulatory regime. Part One describes the common law water rights system and its development in the West. Part Two surveys how courts in Montana and Wyoming dealt with water law issues in the nineteenth century. Part Three traces the development and spread of the “Wyoming System” of central planning for water. Part Four compares the common law and central planning as devices for allocating water. Part Five concludes by drawing lessons for modern water markets and other areas of environmental policy and for the development of water markets from the common law experience with water rights.
dc.format.extent343837 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregon School of Lawen
dc.titleOregon Law Review : Vol. 80, No. 3, p. 861-946 : Lessons from the Development of Western Water Law for Emerging Water Markets: Common Law vs. Central Planningen
dc.title.alternativeLessons from the Development of Western Water Law for Emerging Water Markets: Common Law vs. Central Planningen
dc.title.alternativeCommon Law vs. Central Planningen
dc.typeArticleen


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