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dc.contributor.authorSalazar, Levi A.
dc.date.accessioned2007-12-05T21:10:38Z
dc.date.available2007-12-05T21:10:38Z
dc.date.issued2007-12-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/5319
dc.description6 p.en
dc.description.abstractMany Metropolitan Areas throughout the United States are rapidly approaching a critical juncture in their development as centers for commerce and trade. Metropolitan Atlanta is one area that's posed for potential doom if regional municipalities and state agencies do not start working together to fix regional issues. Due to the area's large supply of affordable land, places of inhabitant have moved farther and farther away from the centers of employment. As development expanded to the outer suburbs, public transportation was unable to handle this growth because it was minimal and uncoordinated. These factors have lead to increasingly dreadful problem with urban sprawl, pollution, and congestion which has started to affect the quality of life for Atlanta's residents. To overcome the decentralized car-dependent planning traditions of the past, Metro Atlanta must develop a regional multi-modal transit station that will accommodate the Atlanta Regional Commission. With the expected growth in the region in the next 13 years, the Atlanta Metropolitan area will have to start rethinking the way it handles regional growth and transportation. Inhabitants of the region will require affordable housing near the places where they work or at least have access to public transportation. The public transportation will have to be provided at a scale and efficiently level so that people will prefer to take it rather than drive to work. Communities and neighborhoods will once again have to become pedestrian friendly and have amenities such as stores, schools and parks within walking distance so people don't have to drive. These improvements to the region will require the constituencies work together with the Atlanta Regional Commission to fund and maintain the building and planning of its infrastructure. There is still hope for the Atlanta region but it will take a reversal in the planning policies of sprawl to a high density urban core supported by public transportation.en
dc.format.extent192517 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregon, Dept. of Architecture, Portland Programen
dc.subjectTransit stationen
dc.subjectMulti-modalen
dc.subjectRegional officeen
dc.subjectAtlanta Metropolitan Area (Ga.)en
dc.subjectTransportation -- Georgia -- Atlanta Metropolitan Areaen
dc.titleArmour Station Office: Project-4: Energy Programen
dc.typeOtheren


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