Tracks to Teito: The Tokyo Train Network and the Meiji Quest For Domestic Hegemony and International Recognition

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Title: Tracks to Teito: The Tokyo Train Network and the Meiji Quest For Domestic Hegemony and International Recognition
Author: Grunow, Tristan R., 1983-
Abstract: From its inception in 1872, with the first line between Tokyo and Yokohama, the Tokyo railway network played a critical role in the domestic and international political aspirations of the new Meiji government. In a domestic form of "railway imperialism," the Meiji government sought to use railways as a means of unifying the country and asserting its legitimacy by centering the network on Tokyo. Meanwhile, to craft Japan as a modem, "civilized" nation-state on a par with the West, Meiji leaders sought to re-create Tokyo as Teito, or the grand "imperial capital" of a unified Japan. These two forms of state-formation culminated in the construction of the monumental Tokyo Station in 1914. With the completion of Tokyo Station as the cornerstone of the national railway network and at the center of the Teito, the Japanese government asserted domestic hegemony and anticipated international recognition as a modem "first class power."
Description: ix, 133 p. A print copy of this thesis is available through the UO Libraries. Search the library catalog for the location and call number.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/8016
Date: 2008-09


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