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dc.contributor.authorOlmsted, James L.
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-19T17:25:15Z
dc.date.available2009-05-19T17:25:15Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citation23 J. ENVTL. L. & LITIG. 451 (2008)en
dc.identifier.issn1049-0280
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/9189
dc.descriptionA print copy of this title is available through the UO Libraries under the call number: LAW LIB. K 10 .O425en
dc.description.abstractThis Article first provides a brief discussion of the historical and philosophical antecedents of real property law in the United States. The Article next provides an historical and legal analysis explaining how conservation easements fit within the current real property regime in the United States. Having thus laid this contextual groundwork, the Article expounds upon the merits of perpetual conservation easements. The final parts of the Article are in rebuttal to challenges to this Article in Professor Mahoney's article, Land Preservation and Institutional Design.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregon School of Lawen
dc.subjectLand conservationen
dc.subjectConservation servitudeen
dc.subjectConservation easementen
dc.subjectNatural areasen
dc.titleJournal of Environmental Law & Litigation : Vol. 23, No. 2, p. 451-490 : Representing Nonconcurrent Generations: The Problem of Nowen
dc.title.alternativeRepresenting Nonconcurrent Generations: The Problem of Nowen
dc.typeArticleen


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