Tear Down the Veils: Francis Bacon's Papal Variations 1946-1971

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dc.contributor.author Hong, Kimberly Yuen, 1984-
dc.date.accessioned 2009-10-21T00:32:57Z
dc.date.available 2009-10-21T00:32:57Z
dc.date.issued 2009-06
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1794/9871
dc.description xiv, 141 p. : ill. A print copy of this thesis is available through the UO Libraries. Search the library catalog for the location and call number. en_US
dc.description.abstract Twentieth-century British figurative painter Francis Bacon (1909-1992) is perhaps best known for his near-obsessive series of papal paintings inspired by Diego Velazquez' renowned portrait Pope Innocent X (1650) and created over the course of Bacon's entire artistic career. The artist's working process plays a crucial role in understanding this celebrated and varied series. Bacon deliberately avoided Velazquez' "original" portrait, preferring instead to work with photographic reproductions of the piece alongside a large collection of seemingly disparate visual material in his chaotic studio at 7 Reece Mews (South Kensington, London, England). This thesis proposes that Bacon explored issues of mechanization, fragmentation, and repetition through these visual juxtapositions in order to offer a critique of artistic and religious institutions. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Committee in Charge: Dr. Kate Mondloch, Chair; Dr. Lauren G. Kilroy; Dr. Ellen Rees en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Oregon en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries University of Oregon theses, Dept. of Art History, M.A., 2009;
dc.subject Bacon, Francis, 1909-1992 -- Criticism and interpretation en_US
dc.title Tear Down the Veils: Francis Bacon's Papal Variations 1946-1971 en_US
dc.title.alternative Francis Bacon's Papal Variations 1946-1971 en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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