Browsing by Author "Cameron, Trudy Ann"

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  • Cameron, Trudy Ann; Crawford, Graham D. (University of Oregon, Dept. of Economics, 2003-12)
    Certain sociodemographic groups often seem to be relatively more concentrated near environmental hazards than in the surrounding community. It is well-known that snapshot cross-sectional statistical analyses cannot reveal ...
  • Williams, Marissa (University of Oregon, 2013-10-03)
    United States agriculture is continuing to shift toward organic production techniques to align with consumer demand, yet organic products make up an insignificant portion of the food market. This disparity has been examined ...
  • Cameron, Trudy Ann; DeShazo, J. R. (University of Oregon, Dept of Economics, 2008-10)
    We show in a theoretical model that benefits of allocating additional attention to evaluating the marginal attribute with in choice set depend upon the expected utility loss from making a suboptimal choice as a result ...
  • Cameron, Trudy Ann (University of Oregon, Dept. of Economics, 2003-07-01)
    Failure to allow for directional heterogeneity can obscure otherwise statistically significant distance effects in hedonic property value models. If ambient pollution data are unavailable, researchers often rely upon ...
  • Cil, Gulcan (University of Oregon, 2015-08-18)
    Health at birth is considered an important indicator of health outcomes in adulthood. It is also shown to have a strong association with future educational attainment and labor market outcomes. I examine the effects of ...
  • Cameron, Trudy Ann; Gerdes, Geoffrey R. (University of Oregon, Dept. of Economics, 2003-01-01)
    Longstanding debate over the appropriate social discount rate for public projects stems from our lack of knowledge about how individual discount rates vary across people and across choice contexts. Using a sample of roughly ...
  • Cameron, Trudy Ann; DeShazo, J. R. (University of Oregon, Dept. of Economics, 2004-03)
    We develop a structural option price model in which individuals choose among competing risk-mitigating programs to alter their probability of experiencing future years in various degraded health states. The novel aspects ...
  • Vander Naald, Brian (University of Oregon, 2012)
    Benefit-cost analysis of environmental policies typically focuses on benefits to human health and well-being. When it comes to humans' willingness to pay (WTP) for improvements in the quality of life for other species, ...
  • Mueller, Rosie (University of Oregon, 2018-09-06)
    This research examines both health effects and market responses from local changes in environmental quality. Both can be of significant interest to policy makers. I examine the health effects of population exposure to ...
  • Fitch-Fleischmann, Benjamin (University of Oregon, 2015-08-18)
    The first essay considers the relative effectiveness of government and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) as channels to allocate resources. I use a catastrophic climate-related shock--Hurricane Mitch--to examine the ...
  • Voorheis, John (University of Oregon, 2016-10-27)
    This dissertation considers two of the most pressing concerns of the current time, income inequality and exposure to pollution, and provides evidence that these two concerns may in fact be causally linked. In order to do ...
  • Kolstoe, Sonja (University of Oregon, 2016-10-27)
    This dissertation uses a convenience sample of members of eBird, a large citizen science project maintained by the Cornell University's Laboratory of Ornithology, to explore the value of avian biodiversity to bird watchers. ...
  • Cameron, Trudy Ann; McConnaha, Ian (University of Oregon, Dept of Economics, 2005-01-01)
    In hedonic property value models, economists typically assume that changing perceptions of environmental risk should be captured by changes in housing prices. However, for long-lived environmental problems, we find that ...
  • Saif, Raisa (University of Oregon, 2012)
    In numerous regions around the globe, climate change can be expected to change the pattern of severe weather events. Migration flows have been systematically larger the higher the proportion of the population in urban areas ...
  • Cameron, Trudy Ann (University of Oregon, Dept. of Economics, 2002-07-20)
    Willingness to pay for climate change mitigation depends on people's perceptions about just how bad things will get if nothing is done. Individual subjective distributions for future climate conditions are combined with ...
  • Taylor, Matthew (University of Oregon, 2012)
    I collect data on subjects' information acquisition during real and hypothetical risky choices using process-tracing software called Mouselab. I also measure subjects' cognitive ability using the cognitive reflective test ...
  • Cameron, Trudy Ann; DeShazo, J. R.; Johnson, Erica H. (University of Oregon, Dept of Economics, 2009-11-22)
    Stated preference (SP) survey methods have been used increasingly to assess willingness to pay for a wide variety of non-market goods and services, including reductions in risks to life and health. Poorly designed SP ...
  • Cameron, Trudy Ann; Crawford, Graham D. (University of Oregon, Dept. of Economics, 2003-12)
    Certain sociodemographic groups often seem to be relatively more concentrated near environmental hazards than in the surrounding community. It is well-known that snapshot cross-sectional statistical analyses cannot reveal ...
  • DeShazo, J. R.; Cameron, Trudy Ann; Saenz, Manrique, 1971- (University of Oregon, Dept. of Economics, 2001-11-05)
    We develop and evaluate a test of choice set misspecification for a multinomial logit choice model. This test determines whether the choice set designated by the researcher mistakenly assigns relevant substitutes to the ...
  • Cameron, Trudy Ann (University of Oregon, Dept. of Economics, 2001-07-14)
    Willingness to support public programs for risk management often depends on individual subjective risk perceptions in the face of uncertain science. As part of a larger study concerning climate change, we explore individual ...

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