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dc.contributor.advisorParsons, Craigen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbney, Margareten_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-03T23:36:21Z
dc.date.available2013-10-03T23:36:21Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/13315
dc.description.abstractDuring the 2011 Arab Spring protests, the Presidents of Egypt and Tunisia lost their seats as a result of popular protests. While protests occurred in Morocco during the same time, King Mohammed VI maintained his throne. I argue that the Moroccan king was able to maintain his power because of factors that he has because he is a king. These benefits, including dual religious and political legitimacy, additional control over the military, and a political situation that make King Mohammed the center of the Moroccan political sphere, are not available to the region's presidents.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregonen_US
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.subjectArab Springen_US
dc.subjectKing Mohammed VI of Moroccoen_US
dc.subjectMonarchyen_US
dc.subjectMoroccoen_US
dc.titleAvoiding the Arab Spring? The Politics of Legitimacy in King Mohammed VI's Moroccoen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Political Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Oregonen_US


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