Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLazrove, Steven
dc.contributor.authorFine, Catherine G., 1950-
dc.date.accessioned2005-10-21T20:28:47Z
dc.date.available2005-10-21T20:28:47Z
dc.date.issued1996-12
dc.identifier.issn0896-2863
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/1778
dc.descriptionp. 289-299en
dc.description.abstractHyperarousal during trauma inhibits the integration of memory. In DID, memory is further disrupted when alter personalities coalesce around individual memory fragments and either reenact conflicts or disown them. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is an innovative psychotherapeutic method which accelerates information processing and facilitates the integration of fragmented traumatic memories. Following a successful EMDR session, patients report that the nature of the traumatic memory has changed and that the event is now less upsetting and “feels over.” A strategy for using EMDR to integrate traumatic memories in patients with dissociative identity disorder (DID) is presented and technical considerations for its implementation are discussed. To the extent that alter personalities often are based on memory fragments, integration of traumatic memory facilitates personality integration. EMDR may be a superior method for working with traumatic memories in that it appears to enhance memory integration and reformulate cognitions concomitantly.en
dc.format.extent411555 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherRidgeview Institute and the International Society for the Study of Dissociationen
dc.titleDissociation : Vol. 9, No. 4, p. 289-299 : The use of EMDR in patients with dissociative identity disorderen
dc.title.alternativeThe use of EMDR in patients with dissociative identity disorderen
dc.typeArticleen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record