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dc.contributor.authorValk, Adrienne van der, 1975-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-04T01:22:20Z
dc.date.available2009-03-04T01:22:20Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/8690
dc.descriptionix, 90 p. A print copy of this thesis is available through the UO Libraries. Search the library catalog for the location and call number.en
dc.description.abstractScholars of American history have chronicled ways in which federal level response to the Civil Rights Movement in the United States was influenced by the ideological and strategic conflict between Western and Soviet Bloc countries. This thesis explores the hypothesis that the same Cold War dynamics shown to shape domestic policy toward black liberation were also influential in shaping foreign policy decisions regarding U.S. relations with recently decolonized African countries. To be more specific, the United States was under pressure to demonstrate an agenda of freedom and equality on the world stage, but its tolerance of independent black action was stringently limited when such action included sympathetic association with "radical" factions. The case of the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations' relationship with the popular and highly visible leader Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana during the time of the Congo crisis is the primary case used in the exploration of this hypothesis.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAdviser: Joseph Lowndesen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregonen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Oregon theses, Dept. of Political Science, M.S., 2008;
dc.titleBlack Power, Red Limits: Kwame Nkrumah and American Cold War Responses to Black Empowerment Strugglesen
dc.typeThesisen


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