The Unity of Teaching and Research: Humboldt's Educational Revolution

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dc.contributor.author McNeely, Ian F.
dc.date.accessioned 2005-10-06T03:23:51Z
dc.date.available 2005-10-06T03:23:51Z
dc.date.issued 2002-09
dc.identifier.citation Oregon Humanities (Fall 2002): 32-35 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1794/1456
dc.description.abstract Before Wilhelm von Humboldt founded the University of Berlin in 1810, it was by no means clear that the university would become the modern world’s dominant intellectual institution. After Humboldt’s reforms, teaching and research came to be seen as its twin, even inseparable, missions. Today, we hear a lot about the difficulties universities face in reconciling their research and teaching obligations. What many see as an unresolvable tension between specialized research and teaching for the masses, Humboldt would have viewed as a false dichotomy. Recapturing the novelty of Humboldt’s revolution promises to help redeem an educational philosophy embattled in many quarters today. en
dc.description.sponsorship Oregon Council for the Humanities en
dc.format.extent 62328 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Oregon Council for the Humanities en
dc.subject Humboldt, Wilhelm von en
dc.subject Universities and colleges -- History en
dc.title The Unity of Teaching and Research: Humboldt's Educational Revolution en
dc.type Article en


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