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dc.contributor.authorAustin, Debra
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-10T18:07:41Z
dc.date.available2017-05-10T18:07:41Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-10
dc.identifier.citation95 OR. L. REV. 425en_US
dc.identifier.issn0196-2043
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/22326
dc.description92 pagesen_US
dc.description.abstractAlmost nothing is more personal than the decision lawyers make about what to eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. In a two-year study examining the health of lawyers, Sharon McDowell-Larsen, Ph.D., discovered that while ninety-two percent of the participants understood that eating habits have health impacts, half reported they consumed unhealthy diets. Additionally, none of these lawyers were vegetarians or vegans, fifty-eight percent consumed meat on a daily basis, and sixty-four percent wanted more health and wellness support from their law firms. Some law firms and law schools are cultivating wellness cultures, but little work has been done in the area of improving lawyer and law student nutrition.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregon School of Lawen_US
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.titleFood for Thought: The Neuroscience of Nutrition to Fuel Cognitive Performanceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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