Preserving the Myth: British and French Relations with the United States Following World War II

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Title: Preserving the Myth: British and French Relations with the United States Following World War II
Author: Hein, James Kenneth
Abstract: At the conclusion of World War II, France and Great Britain were both declining imperial world powers attempting to minimize their loss of influence and prestige. Given similar situations, the two nations nevertheless adopt drastically differing foreign policies. This paper examines both nations' situations following the war in order to ascertain why. The conclusion is that Great Britain was able to maintain its influence by adopting policies in line with those of the United States, which was not a large sacrifice for the British. France, in contrast, was in a reduced state and had to reassert its independence in order to preserve the image of power. Further, the French had a substantially different position regarding postwar Germeny, and its foreign policy, therefore, ovelapped much less with the United States than Great Britain's did. Close American ties would therefore have come at too great a sacrifice.
Description: 53 p. A thesis presented to the Department of Political Science and the Clark Honors College of the University of Oregon in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, June 2002.A print copy of this title is available through the UO Libraries under the call number: SCA Archiv Storage Hein 2002
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/887
Date: 2002-06


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