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dc.contributor.authorUchida, Rika
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-30T21:55:27Z
dc.date.available2017-10-30T21:55:27Z
dc.date.issued1990-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/22960
dc.description112 pagesen_US
dc.description.abstractClaude Debussy lived at a special point in the history of Music: .the turning point from the nineteenth to the twentieth century. As many of his contemporaries did, he tried to free himself from all the limitations of functional harmony and tonality. Instead of using. extreme chromaticism, he employed medieval church modes, whole-tone and pentatonic scales, planing, stepwise root movement, and harmonies built on intervals other than the third. All these factors tend to reject local tonal hierarchies and help to achieve tonal ambiguity. This study traces the gradual shift from clarity of tonality towards tonal ambiguity in Debussy's piano music and examines a variety of compositional techniques that he applied to achieve tonal ambiguity in each work.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Oregon theses, School of Music and Dance, M.A., 1990;
dc.rightsCreative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0-USen_US
dc.titleTonal Ambiguity in Debussy's Piano Worksen_US
dc.typeThesis / Dissertationen_US


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