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dc.contributor.authorBania, Neil
dc.contributor.authorStone, Joe A. (Joe Allan), 1948-
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-15T17:36:30Z
dc.date.available2009-01-15T17:36:30Z
dc.date.issued2007-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/8306
dc.description30 p.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper offers unique rankings of the extent to which fiscal structures of U.S. states contribute to economic growth. The rankings are novel in two key respects: they are well grounded in established growth theory, in which the effect of taxes depends both on the level of taxes and on the composition of expenditures; and they are derived from actual estimates of the link between fiscal structures and economic growth. Estimates for the latter yield a growth hill, in which the incremental effect of taxes spent on productive services and infrastructure initially rises, reaches a peak, and then declines. Rankings derived from these estimates differ sharply from typical rankings based on levels of taxation alone. Two hypothetical policy experiments highlight both the growth-hill effects of tax investments in productive services and infrastructure and the short- and long-term tradeoffs in attempting to fund strong social services.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Oregon, Dept of Economicsen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Oregon Economics Department Working Papers;2008-6
dc.subjectTax investmentsen
dc.subjectFiscal structuresen
dc.subjectEconomic growthen
dc.subjectGrowth theoryen
dc.titleRanking State Fiscal Structures using Theory and Evidenceen
dc.typeWorking Paperen


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