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dc.contributor.authorArrow, Holly
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-09T00:47:10Z
dc.date.available2015-12-09T00:47:10Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.issn0022-3514
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1794/19461
dc.description11 Pagesen_US
dc.description.abstractThree models of change and continuity in group structure are tested using existing longitudinal data on 20 small groups. Groups met face to face or via a computer-mediated communication system for 13 weeks. Computer-mediated groups fit the robust equilibrium pattern best, with initial fluctuations in the influence hierarchy followed by a more stable structure that persisted despite changes in operating conditions. Face-to-face groups fit a bistable punctuated equilibrium pattern best, retaining their initial influence structure until an environmental cue triggered a shift. Contrary to die predictions of this model for radical change, adjustments were modest. Poor performance on tasks failed to trigger changes predicted by the adaptive response model, probably because outcomes were not very important to group members.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0-USen_US
dc.subjectStability in Small Group Influence Patternsen_US
dc.subjectBistability in Small Group Influence Patternsen_US
dc.subjectInstability in Small Group Influence Patternsen_US
dc.subjectSmall group influence patternsen_US
dc.subjectSmall groupsen_US
dc.subjectInfluence Patternsen_US
dc.titleStability, Bistability, and Instability in Small Group Influence Patternsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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